Baby Boomer Celebrity: Who Am I?

Posted on October 4th, 2013 in 1970s,1980s,Celebrities,Me Generation,Pop Culture by Terry Hamburg

 

I was one natty, cool dude, dude. I rose like a meteorite in the auto industry by developing models baby boomers craved. First was the wildly popular Pontiac GTO. Next came the Firebird, soon outselling the Camero. And then the Grand Prix, the most successful new car in 1969 that blew luxury competition out of the water.

I understood the youthful boomer mentality and delivered what they wanted before they even knew they wanted it. Some call that genius. If you got, flaunt it! I became a jet set celebrity, hobnobbing with the rich and famous. Hey, the rich and famous were hobnobbing with me! I was pulling down $600,000 a year (we’re talking the old days) and bought interests in the San Diego Chargers and New York Yankees.

1969 Pontiac Gran Prix

 

Everyone expected me to become President of General Motors, but I’m nothing if not unpredictable and I quit at age 48 to form my own independent motor company. I was plagued by financial problems. About 9000 of my wild sports car were made before the plant closed down. Boomers loved it. I helped define the Me Generation.

1967 Pontiac GTO, one of the first “muscle” cars


The U.S. Government knew I had troubles, so they manipulated a drug sting in 1982 where an informant posed as a cocaine dealer. I played along for a while. Then, I wanted to pull out but feared for my life. It was frickin’ entrapment and the jury agreed with me. I walked out the court a free man. In 1999, I declared personal bankruptcy after fighting over forty legal battles. I became born-again Christian after the entrapment ordeal.

There are still specimens of my car on the road. One was immortalized in the movie Back to the Future. 


My third wife

 

Answer at end of post

 

Baby Boomers by the Numbers

 

Average price of a new car

1950: $1500
1960:
$2600
1970:
$3500
1980:
$7600
1990:
$15,000
2000:
$20,000
2010:
$28,000

 

% of roads paved in the U.S.

1950: 24%
1960:
35%
1970:
45%
2000:
63%

 



Answer




The man and his car: John DeLorean

 

 




It cost $27,500 in 1977. Today, you can buy a new (assembled from original parts) DeLorean with original tech bugs worked out for $57,500.

DeLorean’s third wife was supermodel Cristina Ferrare.

 



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